Quo vadis: Programmer’s Philosophy

Quo vadis: Programmer’s Philosophy

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In any science worth its salt, acknowledging certain elements as the right ones because they have been accepted by the community is rather normal. Some of those assumptions have been sitting on the racks for so long that the perspective of any new idea not supported by the community causes rejection, although they show signs of reality. This is what it is currently happening, and not from a historical point of view, but from a formal and practical one, even within the same concept.

In any science worth its salt, acknowledging certain elements as the right ones because they have been accepted by the community is rather normal. Some of those assumptions have been sitting on the racks for so long that the perspective of any new idea not supported by the community causes rejection, although they show signs of reality. This is what is currently happening, and not from a historical point of view, but from a formal and practical one, even within the same concept.

Quo vadis

Nowadays, no one questions that the object-oriented programming is simpler and more intuitive that the assembler language. Therefore, reviewing new concepts whose form is as simple as a blend of paradigms is no longer a subject of discussion but one of study. Those functional languages that act in harmony with object-oriented programming or those that collect elements from others in order to be created such as GO, Ruby or Python are just some examples. In fact, it is becoming more and more common for a programming language to take elements from others and to integrate them in the most suitable way.

Building a programming language has probably never been as easy as it is now. It only requires to have (extensive, it is true) knowledge in the currently existing languages and to choose the best elements among them all. These new languages usually have the greatest acceptance since they don’t entail the study of a new paradigm.

Right now, there are more programming languages than ever before in the history of computer science and it is really interesting how the marketing phenomenon also has an impact by making some of these languages gain popularity. This is perhaps because they have been sold better in spite of not offering anything really innovative, or because they operate on platforms that arouse more debate on developers’ forums of. It is noticeable how this ecosystem is moving nonstop, faster and faster, since the core release of .NET (an interesting movement by Microsoft) or the new Swift that Apple is trying to use as the replacement for its greatly regarded Objective-C.

In a certain way, it seems that, while in the past clients were being attracted by a certain brand or product regardless of its subsequent development, nowadays it’s the programmers themselves who become the clients and, consequently, brands take an interest in “adopting” developers to fit in within the community of the company and develop applications using the tools it provides. This could possibly be the case because they realised that if the language were of no interest, the product using it would be condemned to disappear, as it happened to Samsung with Bada.

This reminds of the opening of a new market, a market of developers who right now have the power to decide which platforms and which languages to use. It looks like certain things are starting to change, but maybe against the will of those who continue trying to discover the “magic” behind an .exe file.

I, Architect
Josu Uribe Sainz

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